Story Behind FAMOUS Hollywood Logos!

Story Behind FAMOUS Hollywood Logos!

Check out the story behind famous hollywood logos! From dreamworks to warner bros and century fox, did you know the story behind this top 10 list of hollywood studios and their famous logos?

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8: Universal
Definitely one of the classics, Universal has been around since 1914 after it’s founder Carl Laemmle combined several motion picture companies together. Since then, Jaws, Jurassic Park, Scarface and many others have gone on to influence generations of audience members. The first logo designed was a small black and white planet with “The Transatlantic Film Co.” written in the ring. The logo only became planet Earth specifically in 1923, with Universal Pictures written in front of the clouds. Later on the logo added a small plane flying in front of the logo as silent films transitioned into talkies. One of the major changes came in the late 30’s, with a shining, glass display showing “Universal” around a globe. When the company merged with others in ‘46, there was a more classic but standard logo, with simple cursive lettering in front of a spinning globe. The early 60’s saw color screens and had a more mysterious feel, and the latter 90’s version had a zoomed out universe with a single rotating model Earth in the center. Finally, the current model was done in the then new technology CGI, with a small update for the 100th anniversary. This new version even shows lights of cities on a beautifully rendered globe. A long standing titan, universal has released hundreds of pictures and just like their logo have become a global empire.
7: Dreamworks
With animated features such as Shrek and Kung Fu Panda, Dreamworks has been in the business of children’s animated movies for a little while now. It started in 1994, when prolific director Steven Spielberg joined forces with successful record producer David Geffen and former Disney Chairman Jeffrey Katzenberg. The official title of the company is actually DreamWorks SKG, with “SKG” standing for the last initials of its founders. Katzenberg, fresh off his experience working with Disney hits such as The Lion King, was CEO of the newly founded DreamWorks. As for the logo, Spielberg himself is reported to have been the creative force behind the iconic “boy fishing off the moon” design. He pitched the idea of a man fishing off the moon as a throwback to the golden age of Hollywood, in which many films defined a generation. It was originally meant to be in CGI, but the Senior Visual Effects Supervisor at the time suggested a classical painting. This lead to artist Robert Hunt to be commissioned who re-envisioned the logo as a boy fishing instead of a man. The boy used in the final logo is actually based off Robert’s own son, William Hunt, who has become immortalized in many films thanks to his talented father. After getting approval, he worked 3 months on a motion logo that became the official image of the company. Later the logo and introduction would be rendered in CGI, and used for many films such as Over the Hedge and The Road to El Dorado. Recently, the introduction has been updated to take place during the day, with the DreamWorks lettering rendered in a rainbow of colours in order to be more appealing, especially to children. Still relatively new, Dreamworks is becoming a major player in family animation, with some serious talent.
6 Warner Bros.
From the DC Cinematic Universe to Bugs Bunny and the other Looney Tunes, the famous Warner Brothers have covered just about every genre on the market. At over 94 years old, very few people can say they’ve gone through life without seeing one of their films. Arriving in Canada, from modern day Poland, Harry, Albert, Sam and Jack Warner managed to get their hands on a movie projector and started showing films to small American towns until opening their first theatre in 1903. They made small films during WWI, and would eventually officially become Warner Brothers Pictures, Incorporated in 1923, despite the officially listed 1905 founding date. The initial logo is much the same as it is today, a shield with “WB” in large letters inside it. Small changes have happened over the years though. The first logo had smaller lettering, and featured the corporate offices within the shield itself. At one point it was actually red and gold, before becoming the more classic gold and blue we know today. Filmmakers however are reportedly actively encouraged to style the logo to suit the movie it’s in. This has lead to literally hundreds of variations, such as the bugs bunny version for many of the looney tunes cartoons or the stormy, clouded version for the Harry Potter films.

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